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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Cutest Coins Ever Made? Anne Geddes For the New Zealand Mint

Photographer Anne Geddes has been long known for her adorable pictures of babies who are often photographed dressed as fairies, fairytale creatures, flowers and little animals. Her images have been published in books and calendars in 83 counties, and Geddes has proven herself to be a savvy photographer, clothing designer and businesswoman. Born in Australia and now living in New Zealand, Geddes has created a limited edition collection of coins for the New Zealand Mint.

Each of the four coins depicts a baby in typical Anne Geddes style - very cute, curdled up and sleeping! Each coin comes has a face value of $2 and is made of 999 fine silver. The first two coins in the collection were issued in 2012 (the babies sleeping on and in flowers) with additional ones issued in 2013 (baby in a cocoon) and 2014 (Christmas themed).

Sadly KMG Gold doesn't have any of these awesome coins in stock, but we promise we sell a wide range of other (slightly less cute) coins and bullion!
KMG Gold Recycling Anne Geddes NZ Mint Coins
Posted by Mike Gupton at 12:30 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

What to Expect When You Visit KMG Gold

As you've probably heard by now, at KMG Gold we're known for our awesome customer service. We've been recognized by the BBB as an accredited business and we've even won five BBB Torch Awards for our outstanding customer service and business practices.

But if it's your first time selling your unwanted jewellery or other types of precious metals, you might not know what to expect or feel intimidated by the process. The good news is that we make it our goal to make our customers feel very comfortable and explainKMG Gold xray machine everything we do, step by step. Whether you've recycled with us a hundred times before or if it's your first time ever, we'll walk you through the entire process from the moment you step in the door.

And if you don't want to take our word for it, check out our Facebook reviews and see for yourself! The big theme we're noticing throughout the reviews is how happy our customers are that we explain everything to them, no matter how minor it seems. One of the foundations that we built this business on was customer education and it's still an important part of our mandate.

When you walk through our door, we'll ask if you've ever been here before and then invite you to place what you've brought in on a tray. Then we'll run a magnet over the metals to see if they're magnetic. Gold and silver aren't magnetic so if the magnet picks up the jewellery, it means it's just costume jewellery, which we don't purchase. After this, we'll use a jeweller's loupe to see if the metal has any markings on it, like 10K or 18K or 999. If it's silver, we'll make a notch in the metal and use acid to test if it is genuine. This does hurt the piece of metal or jewellery, but we always get your permission to make sure that it's okay before we do it!

If the item is gold or something other than silver, we might run it through our x-ray machine to get a quick and accurate analysis of the exact metal contents of the item. Putting the item in the x-ray machine doesn't do any damage to it, but we'll be sure to remind you of it just in case you're worried!

So don't be shy, come down to 620 Academy Road and we'll give you a complimentary assessment of whatever you've brought in to us. And if this is really interesting to you, you can even buy your own metal testing supplies at do what we do from inside your home!

Pictured: The KMG Gold xray machine.

Posted by Mike Gupton at 12:00 PM 0 Comments

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Silver Bullion From Around the World

Silver bullion coins are very popular here at KMG Gold, with many people seeking them out as a form of safe investment. Many investors prefer silver (and gold) bullion to cash because they protect against inflation and deflation.

Although silver isn't typically used in currency anymore (Mexico is the only country that uses very small amounts in its coins), mints around the world produce their own silver bullion coins that investors and collectors enjoy. Oftentimes, with each new issue of the silver bullion coin in a year, the design will vary slightly but still obtain the coin's original theme.

Silver bullion coins and bars can be sold in many different ounces and come from various mints or mines from around the world. These silver coins and bars are typically 99.9% pure and labelled with ".999". They are sold for more than their face value because of their high silver content, for example, the United States 999-fine Silver Eagle bullion coin only has a face value of one dollar.

Here are some of the world's most popular silver bullion coins:
  • USA - Silver Eagle. Released by the United States Mint in November 1986 and has a face value of $1.
  • Canada - Silver Maple Leaf. Released by the Royal Canadian Mint in 1988 and has a face value of $5.
  • Australia - Silver Kookaburra. Released by the Perth Mint in 1990 and the one troy ounce coin has a face value of $1. Australia also has a Silver Kangaroo which was first minted by the Royal Australian Mint in 1993 and has a face value of $1.
  • China - Silver Panda. Released by the People's Republic of China in 1983 and comes in various sizes with various face values. The one troy ounce coin has a face value of 10 Yuan.
  • Britain - Silver Britannia. Released by the Royal Mint in 1997 and has a face value of 2 pounds.
  • Mexico - Silver Libertad. Released by the Mexican Mint in 1982. These coins do not have a face value.
  • Austria - Silver Vienna Philharmonic. Released by the Austrian Mint in 2008 and has a face value of 1.50 Euro.
  • Russia - George the Victorious. Released by the Saint Petersburg Mint in 2009 and has a face value of 3 rubles.
If you're interested in purchasing silver (or gold or sometimes even platinum!) bullion coins or bars from KMG Gold, please give us a call at 1-877-468-2220 or shop online to see what we have in store. We would be more than happy to set anything you'd like aside for pickup - even if it's not silver bullion
KMG Gold Silver Bullion
Posted by Mike Gupton at 11:30 AM 0 Comments

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

10 Things You Didn't Know About Coin Collecting

Source: Paul Fraser Collectibles

KMG Gold Buys Sells Coins and Numismatics1. Romans began collecting coins as early as 100 AD. Although collecting gold and silver bullion coins has taken place for hundreds of years, the common belief was that coin collecting as we know it today began during the Italian Renaissance. However, new evidence has come to light that suggests Emperor Augustus was interested in collecting coins, often giving old and foreign coins to his friends. One of the first commemorative coins produced was created under the reign of Trajanus Decium (AD 249-251) and depicted all of Rome's deified rulers.

2.Exonumia
This term describes the study of items of numismatic interest, aside from coins and notes. These items often appear under the "exonumia" heading under the backs of catalogs and some examples of these are the altered "hobo nickels" of the US, or China's good luck money charms, both of which are collectible.

3.Stamps were once used as currency
At the beginning of the civil war, American citizens began to hoard coins because they were worried about potential shortages. This, along with trade disruptions from the Confederate Army, led to a shortage of silver and copper-nickel coins and made small transactions nearly impossible.

In response to this, the Postal Currency Act was signed and the public was allowed to use stamps as currency. Inventor John Gault then came up with the idea of encasing the stamps in a small metal container to protect them and even had space for advertising on the back of the container.

4.Coin production is faster than ever
It took the United States Mint two years to produce its first million coins but the Philadelphia Mint can now produce the same amount in 45 minutes. In 2013, the US Mint produced 11.9 billion coins!

5.Current US $100 bills have a slight, conspiratorial difference in them
The clock in the vignette of Philadelphia's Independence Hall on the $100 bill is set to 4:10. However, on the new $100 bills released on October 8, 2013, the clock's hand now reads 10:30. Although there is apparently no significance in the times, the change has conspiracy theorists up in arms!

6.Uzbekistan has the least valuable currency in the world
In 2013 the BBC released a list of the world's least valuable currencies, with Uzbekistan topping the list. One Tiyin is worth the equivalent of 1,999 American cents or 3,038 British pennies. Other countries that were also at the top of the list included Burma, Tanzania and North Korea.

7.1907 was a special year for the US $20 coin
President Theodore Roosevelt ensured that the words "In God We Trust" (a phrase that is heavily repeated on US coinage) were not printed on the 1907 $20 coin. This was because he believed in the separation of church and state and he thought that it showed a lack of respect to God since the money would be used to buy worldly goods and services.

8.The US Mint is more than just that...
While the United States Mint holds 147.3 million ounces of gold that is worth $6.2 billion, it also holds valuable items that belong to other governments and royalty, like Britain's Magna Carta and the crown jewels of St. Stephen, King of Hungary.

It has also housed some of America's most important documents, including the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, three volumes of the Gutenberg Bible and Lincoln's second inaugural address.

9.Travellers cheques are more interesting than you thought!
Between 1118 and 1307, the Knights Templar used a cheque system to fund the travels of pilgrims. This system worked a lot like today's traveller's cheques and was a precursor to how traveller's cheques work today.

10.Dirty money
Coins aren't as dirty as you might think. Only 13% of coins test positive for bad bacteria while 42% of banknotes test positive for bad bacteria like fecal bacteria. And the odor left on your hands after you touch coins is actually caused by you, not the coins. When skin comes into contact with iron, some of the skin oils break down and begin to decompose, creating that smell.

We hope this has been an enlightening post about the world of coin collecting for those who are unfamiliar with it. You can purchase a wide range of coins, numismatics and other products online with KMG Gold at www.kmggold.com!
Posted by Mike Gupton at 12:00 PM 0 Comments